THE HASS

NutroGreen Agro is in process of planting 400 acres of Hass Avocado, also establishing the Pack house, processing unit, cold rooms and developing the nursery beds up to grafting seedlings for our farm and out growers in Uganda.

The Hass avocado is one of the most delicious varieties of avocado around, with a rich creamy flesh and superior taste. Hass avocados make up 95% of all the avocados eaten in the USA and Europe  but you may be surprised to learn that the humble Hass is one of the newest varieties of avocado and didn’t even exist before the 1920’s.

So where did the Hass avocado come from and why is it quickly becoming one of Americans  and Europeans  favorite fruits.

What Makes an Avocado Hass?

Hass avocado trees have high yields compared to other varieties and a mature tree can produce over a million blooms. Most Hass trees bloom twice a year and occasionally there is a third bloom. Hass trees start bearing fruit in three to five years and grow from 15 to 30 feet tall. The lifespan of an average tree is several decades.

Unlike
other avocados, which have smooth green skin, the Hass avocado fruit has dark green bumpy skin that darkens as it ripens, eventually reaching a very dark shade that is almost black. Like all avocados, Hass avocados ripen only once they are picked from the tree and they can be left on the tree for several months after the fruit has matured. When it comes to nutritional content, Hass avocados are higher in fat than other varieties, which gives them a richer taste and smoother, creamier texture. 80% of avocados consumed in the world are Hass avocados, meaning all other varieties make up only a small proportion of the remaining 20%. In the US and Europe, this number rises to 95%

 

aVOCADOS AS A BUTTER OR
FAT SUBSTITUTE

 

Healthy eating and
avocados go hand in hand. Whether it’s calories, fiber, saturated fat or cholesterol, avocados have more of what you want and less of what you don’t want. Naturally cholesterol-, sodium- and trans-fat-free, avocados help reduce the intake of all three when using them as substitutes in sandwiches, on toast or as a spread in place of many other popular foods. When you compare the numbers, they tell a deliciously satisfying story.

Fresh avocado on sandwiches and toast or substituted as a spread in place of many other popular foods may help reduce your dietary intake of calories, fat, saturated fat, sodium and cholesterol.

 

Health-conscious bakers can substitute avocado for many traditional baking ingredients, such as butter or shortening. Simply replace these ingredients with an equal amount of avocado (e.g., replace one cup of butter with one cup of mashed avocado) in any muffin, quick bread and even some brownie and cookie recipes.

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COMPARISON CHARTS AVOCADO SPREAD, DIP AND TOPPING COMPARISONS

Creamy spreads, dips and toppings made from California Avocados add a tasty twist to your meals, and a 50-gram serving of fresh avocados contains zero cholesterol, zero sodium, zero sugar and just one gram of saturated fat. See the chart below for how avocados compare as a substitute on sandwiches, toast and in place of other popular foods.

SPREAD AND DIP NUTRITIONAL COMPARISON FOR FRESH AVOCADOS

  1. Substituting fresh, healthy avocado in sandwiches, on toast or as a spread in place of many other popular foods may help reduce your intake of calories, fat, saturated fat, sodium and cholesterol
  2. Looking for a twist on spreads and dips? One serving of fresh, healthy avocado (one-third of a medium avocado) contains no cholesterol, no sodium and 1 g of saturated fat. See the chart below for examples of how fresh avocados are great in sandwiches, on toast or substituted as a spread in place of many other popular foods
  3. By substituting avocado, you get the healthy benefits of the fruit, and the nutritional value of baked goods may be increased with the fruit’s contribution of nearly 20 vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients, along with heart-healthy “good fats” (poly- and monounsaturated fats). Additionally, the overall calories in a recipe can be reduced by substituting avocado for a higher-calorie ingredient like butter.